Health and Nutrition

July 2, 2015

Vit D and weight loss

Filed under: Cancer,Diet,General Health,Supplements — Doc Joe @ 5:33 pm

Postmenopausal Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial

  1. Catherine Duggan1,*
  2. Jean de Dieu Tapsoba1
  3. Caitlin Mason1
  4. Ikuyo Imayama1,
  5. Larissa Korde1,2
  6. Ching-Yun Wang1,2, and 
  7. Anne McTiernan1,2

+Author Affiliations

  1. 1Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington.
  2. 2University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.
  3. ?*Corresponding Author:
    Catherine Duggan, Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Ave N. Seattle WA 98109. Phone: 206-667-2323; Fax: 206-667-2349; E-mail: cduggan@fredhutch.org

Abstract

Obesity and vitamin D deficiency are associated with risk for several cancers, possibly through inflammation and adipokine-related pathways. Two hundred and eighteen postmenopausal women with BMI > 25 kg/m2 and low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D; ?10–<32 ng/mL), were randomized to 12 months of either (i) weight-loss intervention + 2000 IU/day oral vitamin D3 or (ii) weight-loss intervention + daily placebo. Serum adiponectin, leptin, TNF?, IL6, IL1?, IL8, and IL10, were measured by immunoassay, and a composite inflammatory biomarker score calculated. Using generalized estimating equations, mean changes in outcomes were compared between arms (intent-to-treat), adjusted for possible confounders. Analyses were also stratified by weight-loss (gained/no weight-loss; <5%; 5% to 10%; ?10%). At 12 months, there were no significant differences in analyte changes between arms. In stratified analyses, participants randomized to vitamin D3 who lost 5% to 10% of baseline weight, versus participants who gained weight/had no weight-loss, had significantly greater decreases in levels of IL6 compared with those randomized to placebo: absolute change ?0.75 pg/mL (?17.2%), placebo versus ?1.77 pg/mL (?37.3%), vitamin D, P = 0.004. Similar but attenuated results were observed for participants who lost ?10% of baseline weight: ?0.41 pg/mL (?13.6%), placebo versus ?0.67 pg/mL (?17.3%), vitamin D, P = 0.02. Effects of vitamin D3supplementation on levels of IL1? were inconsistent when stratified by weight loss. There were no intervention effects on IL10, TNF?, IL8, the composite score, adiponectin, or leptin, when stratified by weight-loss. In conclusion, vitamin D3 supplementation in combination with weight-loss of at least 5% of baseline weight was associated with significant reductions in levels of IL6. Cancer Prev Res; 8(7); 1–8. ©2015 AACR.

  • Received December 11, 2014.
  • Revision received March 18, 2015.
  • Accepted April 6, 2015.
  • ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

 

Pomagranate juice and inflamation

Filed under: General Health — Doc Joe @ 4:54 pm
J Inflamm (Lond). 2008; 5: 9.
Published online 2008 Jun 13. doi:  10.1186/1476-9255-5-9
PMCID: PMC2438359

Bioavailable constituents/metabolites of pomegranate (Punica granatum L) preferentially inhibit COX2 activity ex vivo and IL-1beta-induced PGE2 production in human chondrocytes in vitro

Abstract

Several recent studies have documented that supplementation with pomegranate fruit extract inhibits inflammatory symptoms in vivo. However, the molecular basis of the observed effects has not been fully revealed. Although previous studies have documented the inhibition of nitric oxide and cyclooxygenase (COX) activity in vitro by plant and fruit extracts added directly into the culture medium but whether concentrations of bioactive compounds sufficient enough to exert such inhibitory effects in vivo can be achieved through oral consumption has not been reported. In the present study we determined the effect of rabbit plasma obtained after ingestion of a polyphenol rich extract of pomegranate fruit (PFE) on COX enzyme activity ex vivo and the IL-1?-induced production of NO and PGE2 in chondrocytes in vitro. Plasma samples collected before and 2 hr after supplementation with PFE were tested. Plasma samples collected after oral ingestion of PFE were found to inhibit the IL-1?-induced PGE2 and NO production in chondrocytes. These same plasma samples also inhibited both COX-1 and COX-2 enzyme activity ex vivo but the effect was more pronounced on the enzyme activity of COX-2 enzyme. Taken together these results provide additional evidence of the bioavailability and bioactivity of compounds present in pomegranate fruit after oral ingestion. Furthermore, these studies suggest that PFE-derived bioavailable compounds may exert an anti-inflammatory effect by inhibiting the inflammatory cytokine-induced production of PGE2 and NO in vivo.

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