Health and Nutrition

March 3, 2016

Higher Vitamin D Levels Reduce Cancer Death Rates up to 52%

Filed under: Cancer,Diet,Nutrition — Doc Joe @ 2:51 pm

The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism published a meticulous analysis of past trials showing that patients with colorectal cancer, breast cancer, and lymphoma experienced a significantly reduced risk of mortality with higher serum vitamin D levels at diagnosis compared to those with low levels.*

Researchers selected 25 studies involving 17,332 cases of cancer for their meta-analysis.

Compared to lowest quartile, those with vitamin D levels in the top 25% range at the time of diagnosis had far better survival outcomes. For each of the following cancers, the risk of dying decreased by:

  • 37% for breast cancer patients
  • 45% for colorectal cancer patients
  • 52% for lymphoma patients

“By reviewing studies that collectively examined vitamin D levels in 17,332 cancer patients, our analysis demonstrated that vitamin D levels are linked to better outcomes in several types of cancer,” stated Dr. Hui Wang, MD, PhD, Professor of the Institute for Nutritional Sciences at the Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences at the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Shanghai. “The results suggest vitamin D may influence the prognosis for people with breast cancer, colorectal cancer, and lymphoma, in particular.”

Researchers found the strongest links between vitamin D levels and survival in breast cancer, lymphoma, and colorectal cancer. There was less evidence of a connection in people with lung cancer, gastric cancer, prostate cancer, leukemia, melanoma, or Merkel cell carcinoma.

Editor’s Note: Meta-analysis shows 4% reduction in death for all causes for every 4 ng/mL increase in circulating 25-OH vitamin D levels within the range the researchers examined. Serum vitamin D levels in those who don’t supplement are often below 13 ng/mL. By increasing vitamin D intake to 10,000 to 15,000 IU a day, optimal serum levels of 50 to 80 ng/mL can be achieved.

Reference
* JCEM . 2014 Apr 29.

July 2, 2015

Vit D and weight loss

Filed under: Cancer,Diet,General Health,Supplements — Doc Joe @ 5:33 pm

Postmenopausal Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial

  1. Catherine Duggan1,*
  2. Jean de Dieu Tapsoba1
  3. Caitlin Mason1
  4. Ikuyo Imayama1,
  5. Larissa Korde1,2
  6. Ching-Yun Wang1,2, and 
  7. Anne McTiernan1,2

+Author Affiliations

  1. 1Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington.
  2. 2University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.
  3. ?*Corresponding Author:
    Catherine Duggan, Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Ave N. Seattle WA 98109. Phone: 206-667-2323; Fax: 206-667-2349; E-mail: cduggan@fredhutch.org

Abstract

Obesity and vitamin D deficiency are associated with risk for several cancers, possibly through inflammation and adipokine-related pathways. Two hundred and eighteen postmenopausal women with BMI > 25 kg/m2 and low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D; ?10–<32 ng/mL), were randomized to 12 months of either (i) weight-loss intervention + 2000 IU/day oral vitamin D3 or (ii) weight-loss intervention + daily placebo. Serum adiponectin, leptin, TNF?, IL6, IL1?, IL8, and IL10, were measured by immunoassay, and a composite inflammatory biomarker score calculated. Using generalized estimating equations, mean changes in outcomes were compared between arms (intent-to-treat), adjusted for possible confounders. Analyses were also stratified by weight-loss (gained/no weight-loss; <5%; 5% to 10%; ?10%). At 12 months, there were no significant differences in analyte changes between arms. In stratified analyses, participants randomized to vitamin D3 who lost 5% to 10% of baseline weight, versus participants who gained weight/had no weight-loss, had significantly greater decreases in levels of IL6 compared with those randomized to placebo: absolute change ?0.75 pg/mL (?17.2%), placebo versus ?1.77 pg/mL (?37.3%), vitamin D, P = 0.004. Similar but attenuated results were observed for participants who lost ?10% of baseline weight: ?0.41 pg/mL (?13.6%), placebo versus ?0.67 pg/mL (?17.3%), vitamin D, P = 0.02. Effects of vitamin D3supplementation on levels of IL1? were inconsistent when stratified by weight loss. There were no intervention effects on IL10, TNF?, IL8, the composite score, adiponectin, or leptin, when stratified by weight-loss. In conclusion, vitamin D3 supplementation in combination with weight-loss of at least 5% of baseline weight was associated with significant reductions in levels of IL6. Cancer Prev Res; 8(7); 1–8. ©2015 AACR.

  • Received December 11, 2014.
  • Revision received March 18, 2015.
  • Accepted April 6, 2015.
  • ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

 

January 2, 2015

Sunlight Holds Key To Killing Breast Cancer

Filed under: Cancer,Diet,General Health,Nutrition — Doc Joe @ 1:20 am

October 25, 2014

Finally: Missing link between vitamin D, prostate cancer

Filed under: Cancer,Supplements,Vitamin D — Doc Joe @ 2:30 am

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Finally: Missing link between vitamin D, prostate cancer

Date:
October 22, 2014
Source:
University of Colorado Denver
Summary:
A new study offers compelling evidence that inflammation may be the link between vitamin D and prostate cancer. Specifically, the study shows that the gene GDF-15, known to be upregulated by vitamin D, is notably absent in samples of human prostate cancer driven by inflammation.
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study recently published in the journal Prostate offers compelling evidence that inflammation may be the link between Vitamin D and prostate cancer. Specifically, the study shows that the gene GDF-15, known to be upregulated by Vitamin D, is notably absent in samples of human prostate cancer driven by inflammation.

“When you take Vitamin D and put it on prostate cancer cells, it inhibits their growth. But it hasn’t been proven as an anti-cancer agent. We wanted to understand what genes Vitamin D is turning on or off in prostate cancer to offer new targets,” says James R. Lambert, PhD, investigator at the CU Cancer Center and associate research professor in the CU School of Medicine Department of Pathology.

Since demonstrating that Vitamin D upregulates the expression of GDF-15, Lambert and colleagues, including Scott Lucia, MD, wondered if this gene might be a mechanism through which Vitamin D works in prostate cancer. Initially it seemed as if the answer was no.

“We thought there might be high levels of GDF-15 in normal tissue and low levels in prostate cancer, but we found that in a large cohort of human prostate tissue samples, expression of GDF-15 did not track with either normal or cancerous prostate tissue,” Lambert says.

But then the team noticed an interesting pattern: GDF-15 was uniformly low in samples of prostate tissue that contained inflammation.

“Inflammation is thought to drive many cancers including prostate, gastric and colon. Therefore, GDF-15 may be a good thing in keeping prostate tissue healthy — it suppresses inflammation, which is a bad actor potentially driving prostate cancer,” Lambert says.

The study used a sophisticated computer algorithm to analyze immunohistochemical (IHC) data, a task that in previous studies had been done somewhat subjectively by pathologists. With this new technique, Lambert, Lucia and colleagues were able to quantify the expression of the GDF-15 protein and inflammatory cells by IHC staining on slides taken from these human prostate samples.

Additionally encouraging is that the gene GDF-15 was shown to suppress inflammation by inhibiting another target, NFkB. This target, NFkB, has been the focus of many previous studies in which it has been shown to promote inflammation and contribute to tumor formation and growth; however, researchers have previously been unable to drug NFkB to decrease its tumor-promoting behavior.

“There’s been a lot of work on inhibiting NFkB,” says Lambert. “Now from this starting point of Vitamin D in prostate cancer, we’ve come a long way toward understanding how we might use GDF-15 to target NFkB, which may have implications in cancer types far beyond prostate.”


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Colorado Denver. The original article was written by Garth Sundem. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. James R. Lambert, Ramon J. Whitson, Kenneth A. Iczkowski, Francisco G. La Rosa, Maxwell L. Smith, R. Storey Wilson, Elizabeth E. Smith, Kathleen C. Torkko, Hamid H. Gari, M. Scott Lucia. Reduced expression of GDF-15 is associated with atrophic inflammatory lesions of the prostate. The Prostate, 2014; DOI: 10.1002/pros.22911


October 19, 2013

Millions Wrongly Treated for ‘Cancer,’ National Cancer Institute Panel Confirms

Filed under: Cancer — Doc Joe @ 7:30 pm

Over diagnosis and Over treatment in Cancer An Opportunity for Improvement

 

Laura J. Esserman, MD, MBA1; Ian M. Thompson, Jr, MD2; Brian Reid, MD, PhD3

 

JAMA. 2013;310(8):797-798. doi:10.1001/jama.2013.108415

Over the past 30 years, awareness and screening have led to an emphasis on early diagnosis of cancer. Although the goals of these efforts were to reduce the rate of late-stage disease and decrease cancer mortality, secular trends and clinical trials suggest that these goals have not been met; national data demonstrate significant increases in early-stage disease, without a proportional decline in later-stage disease. What has emerged has been an appreciation of the complexity of the pathologic condition called cancer. The word “cancer” often invokes the specter of an inexorably lethal process; however, cancers are heterogeneous and can follow multiple paths, not all of which progress to metastases and death, and include indolent disease that causes no harm during the patient’s lifetime. Better biology alone can explain better outcomes. Although this complexity complicates the goal of early diagnosis, its recognition provides an opportunity to adapt cancer screening with a focus on identifying and treating those conditions most likely associated with morbidity and mortality.

More information here

 

July 11, 2013

Cherries a superfood?

Filed under: Cancer,Diet,General Health — Doc Joe @ 2:29 pm

 

Originally published July 11 2013

Cherries a superfood? Research confirms this well-known fruit tackles cancer, insomnia, high blood pressure and gout

by Carolanne Wright

(NaturalNews) For those of you who love cherries, this ruby sweet fruit is much more than a tasty summer treat. Shown to combat cancer, improve sleep, balance blood pressure and ease gout, you really cannot lose. Compounds found within cherries also relieve pain as well as aspirin. Possessing potent anti-inflammatory properties, these delicious gems are an excellent way to ward off disease. Rich in vitamins and minerals as well as antioxidants, cherries are a powerhouse of nutrition and should be enjoyed often.

Relish the bounty of the season along with improved health

With the cherry season upon us, now is a great time for basking in all the pleasurable, health promoting benefits of the fruit. Here are a few examples of how cherries can enhance your well-being:

Cancer protection – Overflowing with beta carotene, vitamin C, boron and a class of powerful antioxidants called anthocyanins, cherries offer a formidable defense against cancer. As reported by Karen Ansel, M.S., R.D., in Eating Well, “… preliminary studies suggest the anthocyanin cyanidin may prevent genetic mutations that can lead to cancer and keep cancer cells from growing out of control. While tart cherries contain some anthocyanins, sweet cherries pack nearly three times as many (two-thirds are found in the skins). The riper the better: As cherries darken, they produce more antioxidants.”

Better sleep – Cherries provide one of the few naturally occurring sources of melatonin, a hormone that regulates sleep/wake cycles. According to a study published in the European Journal of Nutrition, “These data suggest that consumption of a tart cherry juice concentrate provides an increase in exogenous melatonin that is beneficial in improving sleep duration and quality in healthy men and women and might be of benefit in managing disturbed sleep.”

Pain relief – Research at Michigan State University discovered anthocyanins in cherries relieve pain as effectively as aspirin. Lead researcher Muralee G. Nair, Ph.D., observes, “It is as good as ibuprofen and some of the nonsteriodal anti-inflammatory drugs.” The lab results indicate consumption of 20 tart cherries can significantly reduce inflammation and discomfort.

Regulate blood pressure – Loaded with potassium, cherries are an exceptional food for easing high blood pressure. A balancing mineral, potassium helps to maintain fluid equilibrium within the body by offsetting the bloating effect of sodium. Cherries are also a good source of quercetin, an antioxidant that maintains blood vessel integrity.

Tame gout – A study conducted by the U.S. Department of Agriculture found that women, aged 22 to 40, who consumed approximately 45 sweet cherries after fasting had improved urinary uric acid levels and lowered C-reactive protein. Further research demonstrated anti-inflammatory characteristics of the fruit. When rats were fed 2 ounces of cherries, joint swelling was significantly reduced. Both findings indicate cherries are an exceptional food for painful gout flare-ups.

Sources for this article include:

http://naturalmedicinejournal.com/article_content.asp?article=227

http://www.nutraingredients-usa.com

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22038497

http://www.huffingtonpost.com

http://pubs.acs.org

http://www.eatingwell.com

January 31, 2013

Vitamin D as possible breast cancer treatment

Filed under: Cancer,Vitamin D — Doc Joe @ 4:08 pm

24 January 2013

A study published this last week in the Journal of Cell Biology reports that researchers have uncovered a molecular pathway that contributes to triple-negative breast cancer, a deadly and treatment resistant form of cancer that often occurs in young women. And more yet, vitamin D might be involved in this molecular pathway. A molecular pathway is a series of actions among molecules in a cell that lead to a change in that cell.

Lead author Susan Gonzalo, PhD, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Saint Louis University and colleagues also identified vitamin D as a possible new cancer therapy, in addition to discovering three biomarkers that will help identify patients who may benefit from the new treatment.

Read the rest of the article

June 30, 2012

’60 Minutes’ Reports on the Dangers of Sugar

Filed under: Cancer,Diet,General Health,Nutrition — Doc Joe @ 2:09 pm

July 14, 2007

Calcium and Vitamin D Intake and Risk for Breast Cancer

Filed under: Cancer,General Health,Supplements,Vitamin D — Doc Joe @ 6:15 pm

Journal Watch General Medicine
June 14, 2007

Calcium and Vitamin D Intake and Risk for Breast Cancer

Jamaluddin Moloo, MD, MPH

Journal Watch. 2007;6(6) ©2007 Massachusetts Medical Society

Posted 07/13/2007

Higher calcium and vitamin D intake showed modest benefit in premenopausal women.
Summary

Animal experiments and observational human studies suggest that calcium and vitamin D may decrease risk for breast cancer. Researchers prospectively assessed this relation among 10,000 premenopausal and 20,000 postmenopausal women enrolled in the Women’s Health Study. Calcium and vitamin D intake was determined from self-reported questionnaires about food and vitamin supplement intake.

During a mean follow-up of 10 years, the overall incidence of invasive breast cancer was 2.6% among premenopausal women and 3.6% among postmenopausal women. The hazard ratio for developing invasive breast cancer was 0.61 for premenopausal women at the highest versus lowest quintiles of calcium intake and 0.65 for vitamin D intake. No relation was found between calcium and vitamin D intake and risk for invasive breast cancer among postmenopausal women.
Comment

In this large, prospective study, a higher intake of calcium and vitamin D was associated with a lower risk for invasive breast cancer among premenopausal but not postmenopausal women. Although the hazard ratios appear relatively large, the absolute risk reduction was modest. Limitations of this study include ascertainment of calcium and vitamin D intake only once at baseline and the possibility that unmeasured confounding variables explain the findings in this nonrandomized assessment of diet.

June 16, 2007

Vitamin D Reduces Cancer Risk

Filed under: Cancer,General Health,Supplements,Vitamin D — Doc Joe @ 6:14 pm

Study Shows Risks of Several Types of Cancer Cut in Older Women
By TIMBERLY ROSS AND JEFF DONN, AP

OMAHA, Neb. – Building hope for one pill to prevent many cancers, vitamin D cut the risk of several types of cancer by 60 percent overall for older women in the most rigorous study yet.

The new research strengthens the case made by some specialists that vitamin D may be a powerful cancer preventive and most people should get more of it. Experts remain split, though, on how much to take.

“The findings … are a breakthrough of great medical and public health importance,” declared Cedric Garland, a prominent vitamin D researcher at the University of California-San Diego. “No other method to prevent cancer has been identified that has such a powerful impact.”

(more…)

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